Support groups

Our Goal

Our goal for our Support Groups for people experiencing depression is to meet with you and your peers in a safe an supportive group setting to learn about depression, and ways to manage it, while engaging with others who understand.

We have separate groups for men and women.  Our groups are held in one of the rooms at our offices in the Heartland Services Building every Friday with the exception of public holidays.  You can call directly to self refer or you can be referred by another agency.  The support group leader will call you to arrange a meeting.  You can attend weekly (recommended) or when you are able to.  Gold coin donation/koha for coffee and tea.

Am I depressed?

Are you depressed?  How do you know if what you're experiencing is depression?  Does it matter if your symptoms fit the term?

Throughout our lives, we will all experience depressing times.  It's a sure thing, like death and taxes!  We have relationships, and relationship problems and failures.  We lose people we dearly love and depend on.  We have jobs and all the workplace problems that go along with them.  We have friends who betray us, pets that leave us all too soon, family members that are unsupportive.  We have financial setbacks that feel like we'll never climb out from.  We have expectations of where our lives are headed, only to see the direction isn't at all what we planned.

There are so many ways to get depressed, it's impossible to name them all.  So when these things happen, am I considered to be "depressed"?

The roller coaster of life takes all of us for a ride - it doesn't discriminate between rich and poor, old and young.  And when it happens we experience a myriad of feelings, like abandonment, social isolation, overwhelming sadness that keeps us so tied up in knots that we don't enjoy the things we used to.  Which is normal.

But when those feelings go on for a long time, it becomes what is called "clinical depression".  And that's another story.  Because sometime we can't shut off the depression switch, and something can happen biologically or biochemically that keeps us stuck in pain.  And that's when you've got to tell someone, not just to talk about it, but to ask their help in getting a professional to talk to.  Because if you don't shut off the depression switch, the next time one of those depressing events occurs the roller coaster may just stay in it's downward slop indefinitely.  And then it's really hard to build the momentum to get on with life again.

So tell a friend.  And if they don't understand, tell someone else - a teacher, a boss, a neighbour, a minister, a nurse.  It will be the start of feeling alive and hopeful again.  And that's normal too.